Top 5 London Skyscrapers

I have always loved tall buildings; I don’t know exactly why, but I just love tall/modern skyscrapers. Maybe it’s because they look good, or how they shoot out into the sky, or maybe; they are just simply awesome! Many major cities in the world feature them, but if you want a great selection of variety, London‘s collection of Skyscrapers is probably the best place to go. I used to travel to London quite regularly, but it has been a couple of years now since my last visit, but when I do go to London, I like to look toward the city and just stare at the Skyscrapers. While there are a great selection of Museums to go to, the Skyscrapers for me are the real highlight.

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So yeah, I like these buildings and thought it would be fun to post about my favourites. But of course, as this is a Top 5, there are some that weren’t quite so lucky to get featured. So, here are the other major skyscrapers in London which are sadly not in the Top 5.

So without further a do, here are my Top 5 Favourite Skyscrapers in London; Enjoy!

Wikipedia

5. Strata SE1 – Nicknamed the Razor or Electric Razor; I have another name for it: Isengard! I don’t know why, but I think my Mam named it that on a trip to London one time; and since then the name just sort of stuck with me. It’s distinctive shape, combination of colour styles and shapes plus the iconic wind turbines at the summit make this building stand out in several ways, which when blended altogether makes it a really cool building!

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4. The Shard – Upon completion; The Shard was the tallest building in Europe; but now it stands as the sixth due to a wave of taller buildings built in Russia. Nevertheless it is still the tallest building in the UK. Named The Shard, due to it’s design being similar to a shard of glass, the building looks very similar to many of the worlds tallest buildings today, by starting wide at the bottom and getting gradually thinner towards the top. It may be a little generic in design, but it’s height and shape still creates a good looking building to this day!

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3. 122 Leadenhall Street – Sometimes buildings such as these are registered online by their street address; not necessarily what they are known by. In this case though the building is also known simply as the Leadenhall Building (as well as the Cheesegrater). From shape alone, the wedge does provide an element of character to it, providing another dimension in design rather than it being a thin cuboid. The building’s shape is pretty cool!

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2. 30 St Mary Axe – Also known as The Gherkin; I remember going on a trip to London once with my Dad, and we looked out on the London Skyline, and I noticed this strange shape going up. It wasn’t square or rectangular, it was a strange round like shape. It is a strange shape to appear in the city, but that’s what makes it stand out in the first place. The colour scheme is pretty cool too, and does stand up as a nice work of art, but also blends in with the city around it, by not being a disgusting sight! They could have just gone the full hog and made something that looks as ugly as it’s shape, but instead they made something which blends together brilliantly with it’s surroundings!

Wikipedia

1. One Canada Square – In comparison to it’s more contemporary competitors, Canary Wharf‘s central feature could look pretty bland and boring by today’s standards. But thanks to it’s height and shape that suggests a grand level of power, it still looks pretty good. It’s not thin neither, it’s pretty wide, and the way it just reaches for the sky makes it look taller than the buildings which are now taller than it! It uses a classic design, but a design that works and creates a grand sight to behold and one that you won’t want to forget in a hurry. It may be a more simple design by today’s standards, but it just works!

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